Subscribe


How to lose weight and keep it off for good!

A DIET high in protein and with a low glycemic index rate is the best for staying slim, according the results of the world’s largest diet study. Titled Diogenes, the study was undertaken by researchers at the University of Copenhagen, and spanned eight countries, involving 773 overweight participants. The study was hailed by the team at Kellogg’s Nutrition who hosted a special breakfast in Centennial Park Sydney to unveil the results, which tied in with its own Special K philosophy of high protein, low GI. “Most people when they try, can lose weight, the problem is keeping it off,” said Kelloggs’ Julie Howden, adding: “80% of dieters regain their weight in two years, and two out of three put on more than they lost.” A range of options were tested, and overall the people on the high protein, low GI diet had the lowest drop-out rate and generally maintained their weight loss, whilst the low protein, high GI and control groups regained weight. In addition to weight maintenance, the high protein, low GI diet also showed the best results for bone and muscle maintenance, and was found to reduce inflammation, as well as the risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Pictured at the breakfast are,from left: TV trainer Michelle Bridges, Julie Howden of Kellogg’s, and Sydney Uni’s Prof Jennie Brand-Miller. A DIET high in protein and with a low glycemic index rate is the best for staying slim, according the results of the world’s largest diet study. Titled Diogenes, the study was undertaken by researchers at the University of Copenhagen, and spanned eight countries, involving 773 overweight participants. The study was hailed by the team at Kellogg’s Nutrition who hosted a special breakfast in Centennial Park Sydney to unveil the results, which tied in with its own Special K philosophy of high protein, low GI. “Most people when they try, can lose weight, the problem is keeping it off,” said Kelloggs’ Julie Howden, adding: “80% of dieters regain their weight in two years, and two out of three put on more than they lost.” A range of options were tested, and overall the people on the high protein, low GI diet had the lowest drop-out rate and generally maintained their weight loss, whilst the low protein, high GI and control groups regained weight. In addition to weight maintenance, the high protein, low GI diet also showed the best results for bone and muscle maintenance, and was found to reduce inflammation, as well as the risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Pictured at the breakfast are,from left: TV trainer Michelle Bridges, Julie Howden of Kellogg’s, and Sydney Uni’s Prof Jennie Brand-Miller.